What Is Full Virtual Reality? Less Than 100 Words

Full virtual reality (VR) allows a learner with a headset on to move freely in their virtual environment, as well as interact with and manipulate objects. 

A step up from 360º VR, full VR uses 6 degrees of freedom (6DoF), which enables learners to physically move forward and backward, up and down, and left to right.  

Full VR has the following characteristics:

  • Requires game production and technology
  • Creates an entirely digital environment
  • Highly interactive
  • Can cost from $50,000 to $150,000 or more

Ready to learn more about full VR? Let’s dive into what full VR is and an example of a full VR training program

 

What Is Full Virtual Reality?

Full virtual reality (VR) allows a learner with a headset on to move freely in their virtual environment, as well as interact with and manipulate objects.  

A step up from 360º VR, full VR uses 6 degrees of freedom (6DoF), which enables learners to physically move forward and backward, up and down, and left to right.  

Full VR has the following characteristics:

  • Requires game production and technology
  • Creates an entirely digital environment
  • Highly interactive
  • Can cost from $50,000 to $150,000 or more

The main difference between 360º VR and full VR is that 360º VR provides learners with a fixed viewpoint where they interact with objects via gaze control or laser pointer controller. Full VR allows learners to physically move within their virtual environment and interact with objects by picking them up as they would in real life. 

 

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Example Of Using Full Virtual Reality For Training

In this full VR experience, the learner has 6DoF within their virtual store environment. Placed behind the register, the learner must practice how to appropriately respond to a robbery situation. 

The learner uses VR controllers to physically touch their point-of-sale (POS) system and manage the cash register. A video recorded actor brings the training scenario to life by allowing the learner to react physically through their actions instead of just making text choices.